• Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow 25 Products Worth the Investment

    Everyone has a weird attachment to their hair.

    You have it, I have it.

    While we may all have it to varying degrees (think emotionally distressed female characters chopping off their luscious locks… or Britney circa 2007), hair—the very length, cut, and color of it—is more or less tied to our image and identity.

    That being said, what we do to our hair is important.

    Fortunately for you, I went ahead and ventured forth as a guinea pig and test rat of sorts. Back from my research and armed with a plethora of knowledge and information, I’m here to share the best of the best!

    Shampoo & Conditioner

    For thirsty hair:
    Let Amika‘s Triple Rx Shampoo and Conditioner work their magic into your lovely lady (and lad) locks. My hair always feels so silky smooth after using  these two products!

    For damaged or stressed hair:
    Turn to Schwarzkopf BC Hairtherapy‘s Repair Rescue Shampoo and Conditioner! The Repair Rescue line uses Biomimetic Repair Technology to copy nature’s protein-lipid barrier. Your hair will grow stronger all while staying moisturized. Best of all, you can both the shampoo and conditioner at your local Ulta!

    For more volume:
    Rahua‘s Voluminous Shampoo and Conditioner are made with 100% organic ingredients that create bouncy volume in your hair without drying the strands out. If you’re into herbal and natural scents, you’ll love this duo!

    For cancelling out brassy tones:
    Get rid of the “orange” in your hair with dpHUE‘s Cool Blonde Shampoo and Conditioner. After coloring my hair, I noticed that the bleached strands started to fade into a brassy tone within days. The violet in these products helped to cancel out yellowness!

    Dry Shampoo & Hairspray

    Schwarzkopf’s OSiS+‘s Refresh Dust and Amika‘s Perk Up Dry Shampoo are great for absorbing those (not-so-pleasant looking) oils in the hair for when you’re too lazy to hop in the shower. 😉

    To secure and hold your gorgeous hairstyle, Drybar‘s The Warden Hairspray is perfect for the night out, as it has a long-lasting power and helps to maintain the hair’s natural shine. For more of a matte finish, go for Kenra Professional‘s Platinum HiDef Hairspray 16. Both are flake-free!

    Leave-In & Hair Mask

    I don’t normally style my hair, but when I do, I like to include a bit of leave-in for volume and extra silkiness. My faves are It’s A 10‘s Miracle Leave-In Plus Keratin and Vine de la Vie‘s Vin D’or Leave-In Styling Elixir!

    Just like my face, my hair occasionally needs a mask as well! Hair masks are infused with vitamins, and great for all hair types, especially for those with damaged hair. I like Amika‘s Nourishing Mask and Vine de la Vie‘s oR Noir Mask!

    Treatment & Heat Protectant

    Make your hair ends meet by quenching their thirsts with a conditioning treatment. Wen Sixthirteen‘s Ultra Nourishing Treatment Oil and Kenra Professional‘s Revive Treatment target damaged hair strands and offer a boost of hydration!

    Ladies and gents, this is v important! Before using heat tools, always remember to use protection… for your hair! This prevents breakage and dryness. Drybar‘s Hot Toddy and Briogeo‘s Rosarco Oil are amazing at protecting hair from heat!

    Hair Tools

    Some of my go-to hair tools:

    Hopefully this helps you with your hair needs! Tell me what your all-time favorite hair product is in the comments below! 

  • 10 New (Simply Amazing) Accessories for Fall

    My New Favorites

    I determined a few weeks ago that this fall and winter, accessories would be my THING.  Not only are they well-priced, they don’t require a huge wardrobe overhaul each season to stay on top of the trends. Be it silk scarves, hats, cozy scarfs, gloves, or ponchos, they officially have leading roles in my upcoming looks.

    Truth be told, my accessories craze couldn’t be timed better for my closet as I’m thrilled to reveal today that I’m the newest partner of Echo, the New York City scarf company crafting the loveliest of accessories since 1923.  Together we’re working on the #ChangeYourStripes campaign by elevating wardrobes everywhere simply by accessorizing!  From their silk scarves, to beanies, gloves, ponchos, and everything in between, the beauty of Echo’s accessories is that they allow you to change your look, your mood, or someone’s perception without ever losing yourself, the way that clothes sometimes can.  Echo harnesses this transformative power of accessories through the expert use of color, pattern, and texture in their fashion and home products.

    So with style in mind, let’s dive headfirst into my Top 10 List of New Favorite Accessories for the upcoming chillier seasons..

    1. Silk Scarves

    You know Echo’s silk scarves when you see them, the ultimate do-everything accessory.  Here we have the Enchanted Forest Silk Scarf, my favorite piece from their new line available now, styled 3 ways…

    scarf1

    Around the neck…

    scarf3

    As a bandana…

    scarf2

    Around the wrist…

    2. The Black Beanie

    The black beanie is a wardrobe staple, always in style, and totally chic when the temps drop below 50 F.  This one is luxuriously soft, wearable all day long.

    blackbeanie

    3. The Skinny Silk Scarf

    From the pages of Vogue to the necks of fashionable women everywhere, the skinny silk scarf has taken Manhattan, Paris and London by storm this season.  Check out Echo’s gorgeous version in every color imaginable.

    blackskinny1blackskinny2

    blackskinny3

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Will be wearing this everywhere…

     4. The Blanket Wrap

    Nothing is cozier than a binkie, amirite? So every human on earth will be happy to learn that blankets are fashions now, wearable around your neck in the softest of fabrics and pretties of colors.  Meet The Blanket Wrap!

    blanketwrap

    Warm and Soft!

    5. Hats with Style

    Trust me, nobody is more excited to wear these beanies with a furry little pom on top than me.  I got this guy in 3 charming, wardrobe-ready colors but it’s available in many more.  Talk about soft and chic!

    furgloveshat2Black, Grey, and Purple Beanies with Furry Poms

    blackhat

    greyhatpurplehat

     

     

     Love in every color!

      6. The Leather Glitten

    I’m all about gloves once the temperature gets chilly.  My hands literally freeze without them, and these adorable glittens are totally IN right now.  Not only do they clip back to reveal a delightful finger glove, they are also iPhone ready with a magnetized finger!

    undoneglove1

    Fingers optional!
    undoneglove2Look at those warm digits!

    7. Everyday Ruanas

    Guys, wraps are THE thing right now.  I bet you’ve seen like 3 ladies wearing a ruana already today. They’re cozy, warm, and stylish while being totally effortless.  This black one is at the top of my list right now.

    blackblanketwrap

     

    8. The Fur Glove

    Nothing screams #ChangeYourStripes more than a glove with a touch of fur.  I love these from Echo, plus they have the built in cell phone finger that’s a must-have these days.

    furgloveshat

    9. The Bandana Scarf

    Hello, Paris Fashion Week!  The Bandana is officially BACK (or did it ever really leave?), y’all!  I’m absolutely coveting this black number with fringe, aka the Yak Triangle with Fringe.

    blacktrianglescarf

    10. The Reversible Ruana

    What’s better than 1 ruana?  2 ruanas, obviously.  This perfectly colored number is totally versatile, not to mention warm and in style.

    orangeblanketwrap


    I hope you enjoyed my top 10 picks for new accessories for fall and winter!  I’m so excited to be partnering with Echo on their #ChangeYourStripes campaign this holiday season and you can expect more fun from us soon with some great upcoming giveaways and events.  What’s your must-have accessory?  A classic silk scarf or cozy beanie?  Tell me below in the comments!


    Shop The Look

  • Blondes Have More Fun

    …and I’m Having an OK Time

    Chronicles of a Hair-Dyer

    Wednesdays are reserved for adventures.

    Hey, LoDown fam! It’s Chris again, the sad sack of garbage who brought you the juice cleanse story. I’m back because you all enjoyed reading about my agony (how dare you). On this particular adventure, I will explore the world of hair dying. Now, I won’t be talking about going to a salon or whatever people who have money and time do to get their hair professionally done because that would be too simple and too easy. I’m talkin’ about sitting on my bed while my friend, who is visiting, has no time to think of an excuse to get out of helping me. Ah, friendship.

    But first, where are my manners? Allow me to give you some backstory as to why I dyed my hair. A few months ago, I stole a MacBook from the Apple Store and ended up killing a man to get away and needed a new identity. Just kidding, although that would probably make for a much better adventure—maybe next month?

    In all seriousness, I’ve wanted to dye my hair white for so long because I just wanted to do something crazy and live on the edge. Naturally, I turn to hair dying for that rush of adrenaline. I know, I know. I’m WILD!!!! One day, I thought long and hard, which means maybe 2 minutes tops, about it and realized that it’s only hair, and as the great Drake once said, “YOLO”.

    To be honest, I went into this process like Helen Keller went up stairs—very blindly. I couldn’t have known less when I walked into Ricky’s NYC to get an buttload of hair bleach (yes, buttload is an actual form of measurement) and a bunch of other miscellaneous stuff. Back at my apartment, my room suddenly felt like the set of Breaking Bad because my friend Dori and I were mixing chemicals with other chemicals in a very small space.

    Here are all of the chemicals I put in my hair...science is cool!!!!

    Here are all of the chemicals I put in my hair…science is cool!!!!

    #friendshipgoals or me not giving her any other options? Basically the same thing...

    #friendshipgoals or me not giving her any other options? Basically the same thing…

    After 45 minutes and tolerating the feeling of each hair being plucked out one by one, I washed the first round of bleach out only to find that I looked like a mass-murdering Ed Sheeran to star in a redundant Marvel film coming out early next year. At this point, I was saying what my mom probably said at my birth, “WHAT THE F%$K HAVE I DONE”?

    My "Ed Sheeran just landed a role as a villain in a Marvel film" look

    My “Ed Sheeran just landed a role as a villain in a Marvel film” look

    I am a goddamn trendsetter, guys.

    I am a goddamn trendsetter, guys.

    After recuperating, we did a second round of bleach to get my hair even lighter. At this point, it felt as if every Boy Scout troop ever created was having a bonfire on top of my head. Fun! I washed that out and toned my hair with a “Pale Ash Blonde” color, which to me translated to “a bunch of adjectives all describing the same thing” but that is neither here nor there. By now, I was happy with the color, mostly because it didn’t feel super yellow blonde and because I had left behind my role in the upcoming Marvel film. Looking back on it now, with a head full of dead white hair, I hate the color “Pale Ash Blonde” created.

    Processed with VSCOcam with hb2 preset

    The outcome of the “Pale Ash Blonde”, or as normal people call it: “Gray blonde”

    You may be asking, “But Chris! How did you get your hair white?”. Fantastic question, *insert your name here*. The secret to getting your hair as light as possible without fully killing it is using Shimmer Light’s purple shampoo and conditioner. I leave the conditioner in for 3-5 minutes. It’s crazy how well the conditioner turned my hair white/slight purple tint.

    You also may be asking, “But Chris! Was it worth it?”. Okay, first of all, you need to relax with all these questions. But yes, I couldn’t feel happier and more myself with my new hair. I look at old photos with my brown hair and I feel like that isn’t the real me. I am so much more confident and have learned to really live for myself and not worry about what other people think, which hasn’t ever really been an issue for me. My message to you would be to just do it if you’re thinking about dying your hair. It’s hair. But also, it’s really difficult hair to maintain. I was thinking I would just dye my hair and everything would be great, but it’s a lot of maintenance, which is something I absolutely despise.

    Finally! My hair is so white, it can talk back to cops (Photo by Alivia Latimer)

    Finally! My hair is so white, it can talk back to cops and get away with it (Photo by Alivia Latimer)

    I can’t believe I just wrote a whole adventure about my hair, but it’s happened and there’s no turning back now. Let me know in the comments which hair color you like better and also what color you would want to dye your hair!

    Team Brown? Team White? Team Who-Gives-A-F%$K-About-My-Hair-Color?

    Team Brown? Team White? Team Who-Gives-A-F*$K-About-My-Hair-Color?

    Blondes Have More Fun
    Thoughts on my hair color?
  • Big, Curly Hair: How To Manage God-Given Volume

    Kate Branch has a great head of hair—we’re talking signature volume and texture. Which is why, when she told us that she’d spent most of her lifetime in an epic battle against it, we pressed her on what changed her mind. Her response involved Sally Singer, Solange, and blowdrying only the top fourth of her hair, so we thought her journey.

    Your eye color is suddenly translucent, cheeks are flushed, there is soft rosy halo around your lash line, and your lips…your lips deepen as blood rushes through them and creates a beautiful, tragic look. This lip happens to work well for day or evening and doesn’t require you to cry! This method allows you to wear any lip color in a very natural and believable way.

    The secret to this look is creating a soft halo around your lip line. Start by taking your favorite lipstick, stain, or chubby lip pencil and saturating the color just on the center of your lips. Then, take your finger and blend the color over your lips as if you are rubbing [blockquote author=”” pull=”pullright”]I can’t wait for you to try the crying lip. It’s so beautiful, it will bring you to tears.[/blockquote]

    Once the color starts dissolving into your lips, drag your finger right on top of your lip line, bleeding the color into your lip—especially over your cupid’s bow. It’s like finger painting on a sensual canvas, leading to the perfect stain that will last for hours.

    This technique will also allow you to use those beautiful pops of color you’re always eyeing but never dare to buy, since the method will only capture the color’s essence. My favorite three colors to use for the tragic lip are a coral red, a classic mauve, and a deep wine. The first color I used in the pictures is YSL’s Rouge Pur Couture Vernis À Lèvres Glossy Stain in 8 Orange De Chine (which also made an appearance in this week’s lip stain roundup!)—the perfect orange-coral stain, but you must work quickly with blending as it sets quick. The second look is the rosy-mauve Clé de Peau Beauté Extra Rich Lipstick in 106. This creamy formula feels so heavenly on the lips and imparts the perfect “you-could-never-go-wrong” color, giving you a super-natural, yet flattering look. The third color is the Nars Velvet Matte Lip Pencil in Train Bleu. Swipe this vampy color dead-center on lips and give it a good rub down to transform your mouth into a deadly weapon that kills silently.

    I grew up in the north suburbs outside of Chicago, surrounded by friends who were all beautiful, and funny, and smart.

    I grew up in the north suburbs outside of Chicago, surrounded by friends who were all beautiful, and funny, and smart.

    It was at T that I was fortunate enough to meet my hair stylist, Mike Viggue. He cut his teeth at Sally Hershberger’s salon and now occasionally assistants the legendary Anthony Turner on set and during fashion weeks. The first time I went to him, I asked for the good stuff: a keratin treatment. Six months later, I needed another fix, but he wouldn’t give it to me. “Your texture is too interesting to ruin,” he said. Interesting? For the next few years he cut and styled my interesting hair with his very capable hands, and a touch of Shu Uemura Yokan Craft hair wax, until I was ready for the ultimate test: a bob. I have been told by countless hairdressers that I would never be able to have bangs or short hair like my peers. Physics just wouldn’t allow for it, they’d say. But Mike did it for me, sans bangs, and taught me a few tricks to keep it from, well, not being wider than long.

  • Out With The Bob, In With The Twisted Bun

    Marlyn Alarm is a singer from Miami, Fla., undergoing formal gender transition after living a full year living as a woman. But her struggle with identity is not a new one.

    “Today I was asked when I realized I was in the wrong body. As much as it took me a really long time to come to terms with it, I think I have known since I can remember—since I could even think about gender or notice it. I was thinking about when I was in pre-K ,and I would dress up as Cinderella and do girl things. If I decided to wear a dress or roleplay as a princess, my teachers would tell me I couldn’t do it because I was a boy. So when you have everyone in your life telling you that you’re a boy, you kind of start to believe it, even though none of it comes naturally to you.

    My transition has been a very gradual, very cerebral process. For a lot of people, it’s very easy to reduce gender to bodies, and that’s terrible. So to answer that question that I was asked today, I realized I was a woman after I was already living as a woman for about a year or so. Before that, I had this platinum blond hair, acrylics, and would dress in skirts, and wear purses—but I still identified as male. I was open-minded enough, growing up, to think that even if my outward appearance was female, I could still be male. If you read enough queer theory, you realize any sort of conjunction is possible. There are boys who want experience life as women but still be boys, and that’s valid.

    I never understood why people would think that men couldn’t be as beautiful as women, so for a long time I didn’t have a word for myself. I was like, ‘I’m not a boy but I can’t let myself be a woman.’ So at the time I was like, ‘OK, I’ll be something else.’ It was weird for me, and in some ways, my thinking allowed me to keep putting off how I felt inside by just covering it up with this cerebral explanation.

    [blockquote author=”” pull=”normal”]There is a lot of psychological tension in trying to discuss anything with gender identity.[/blockquote]

    I used to wear a lot more makeup. I fucking love Boy George, and I would put on that amount of makeup—like Boy George amounts of makeup. My eyeliner would like reach my hairline. I would go really crazy with it. I would try to overcompensate. Now I’m much more toned down, but I feel like all girls have that phase when experimenting with makeup for the first time. Though, if I started off putting on the amount of makeup I wear now, I knew I would just look like who I really am, and I think I was just not ready for that.

    I was 14 years old when I got my first taste of makeup. I was in a band as the lead singer and we were playing one of our first shows. At that point all I could get away with was straightening my hair maybe once a month. So yeah, I was at my first show, and I remember finding a Revlon retractable black eyeliner in the bathroom. I put it on my waterline, not even thinking about the fact that I could get an eye infection as I picked it up off the floor—it was disgusting. I guess the cool thing about being in a band is that there is so much more freedom. There’s the classic ‘Dude (Looks Like A Lady)‘-feel. I felt like I could wear the eyeliner, and no one would care because I was at a rock show. Then I wore it again to a crowd that was more of a hardcore scene, and it wasn’t a cool experience. They were screaming at me to get off the stage and calling me the F word. I was just like, ‘Wow, OK.’ I was 15 at that point. It was a terrible wake up call to me, all because I was wearing eyeliner—it’s not that big of a deal, and yet, people are already policing me for not performing this gender that I’m pretending to be. Obviously I was doing a shitty job at performing male. Sometimes I tell people that I really feel like I was in drag for over a decade, in the sense of performing male gender roles. I’d end the night and make sure to wipe off my eyeliner before I got home.

    Habits-Stylish-Women

    I had really bad acne in high school, so I’d get away with wearing coverall and that’s it. Still, my mother would look at me from her bed—I did, and still do, my makeup in her room because it has the best lighting—and be like, ‘What are you doing?’ I used to tell my mom like, ‘Don’t worry! I’ll never wear mascara!’ But it all happens…100 YouTube tutorials later you emerge in full face [Laughs].

    I always admired makeup. I’d watch my grandma doing her makeup, and she’d always be put together. She would tell me that photos are forever, you can’t take it lightly, and you have to perfect it. Little things like that really stuck with me. Without my mother’s permission, I dyed my hair platinum blonde as a teenager. Having white hair changes your life, regardless of gender identity. It is a really crazy experience. You learn about so many different sides of people and how they perceive you—it’s crazy. It was motivation, I guess, and it was the first instance of feeling like I can’t hide myself.

    I was really obsessed with Final Fantasy at the time, especially the Final Fantasy villains. If you really look at a Final Fantasy villain and analyze it, it’s a female head on a male body. I felt connected to the possibility of being really pretty, even if my body didn’t match up—there was a chance for the head portion to be on-point and consistent with how I view myself. After that, I started really diving into makeup as identity. Beauty can be a big deal for all girls, but beauty for a trans girl could be life-or-death. There’s moments when you could be placed in danger for not passing as a woman convincingly enough. One time I was walking with my friend and a guy was trying to holler at me, then he took out a knife. Makeup is much more serious to trans women. Even cis girls can relate—they get attacked and bullied in schools, growing up, because they’re not pretty enough.

    I really feel bad for a lot of trans people and trans women who don’t have the experience [with makeup] before they come into themselves and have to learn to do their makeup in no time. They’re 35, they have kids, and they need to transition then—that’s the bravest thing ever. That’s not to say that I think people transitioning later in life necessarily need to wear makeup to be who they are. I just identified with it. The way I did it was just like how every girl picks up makeup skills—where your mom is like, ‘You can only put on lipgloss.’ You need time to practice, so it looks good. I used to just have these Zen three-hour makeup sessions. Of course, during the day I just wear tinted moisturizer, concealer, and maybe mascara. Sometimes I’ll do a wing, but just a little bit on the outer edge. But at night…at night is when I’d really take my time. I’d do my makeup from 7pm to 10pm and go out at midnight.

  • Nix Clumpy Lashes & Make Lips Pop

    To say we’re more obsessed with bareMinerals’ founder Leslie Blodgett than we are with the product itself would be a lie, so we like to say we love both equally.

    She’s a sun-kissed blonde, straight-across—no muss, no fuss. She came into the office wearing a red cardigan and ate Sour Patch Kids waiting for hairstylist Didier Malige to give her a haircut. Not necessarily something drastic—but something new. Spring may have arrived with a hefty dose of snow this year, but once the seasons change, it’s hard not to feel like a little personal change is in order.

    He takes Louise's hair and begins to cut long layers at the ends with scissors.

    He takes Louise’s hair and begins to cut long layers at the ends with scissors.

    Eventually Didier walks in and there’s Louise, hunched over, playing with her split ends. Maybe expecting someone with layered, voluminous head of hair ready for experimentation, instead he got the epitome of Midwest simplicity. She recently graduated with a degree in photography (eventually she plans on working as a photojournalist) and made it through the four years of school cutting her hair maybe once. Her daily routine consists of washing and leaving her hair to air dry without brushing, in hopes of keeping any waves.

    You should be a bit more wild,” Didier tells her. When she says at this stage, she already feels “too old for that now,” he responds: “Are you crazy? You haven’t even discovered life yet!” Haircuts are best served with a side of sage advice, we find.

    Didier is known to be scissor happy—he’s comes from the school of hairstylists in the ’60s and ’70s who made sex hair a thing. “I’m not attracted to very neat hair. I think it’s an American thing to smooth and tame. Now, you don’t see any more pictures of models with little hairs sticking out. It’s all Photoshopped out.”

    He takes Louise’s hair and begins to cut long layers at the ends with scissors. “Do you want to look?” He asks her. “No, I trust you,” Louise says. It couldn’t really be called a full-blown haircut, but rather a few stylized, strategic snips to give it more body. He then soaked Louise’s hair in L’Oréal Wild Stylers by Techni.Art Beach Waves for some matte, subtle texture. Soaked isn’t an exaggeration—he kept forewarning Louise that he was really going to wet it. Windblown effects can be attributed to hosting the photoshoot part of the gathering on the roof.

    “I think I’ll keep it,” she says as she looks at the photos—just before Didier sweeps it up into a different look, this one more cockatiel cum black tie updo. Inspired by Louise’s vintage Celine secretary blouse, Didier went with the 1940s feel to create the rebellious Euro counterpart to the doughnut-ified American top-knot. It’s wild looking, but at least half of the fun comes from knowing you’ve got bangs, without actually having to get bangs. Maybe next time, Didier.

    Louise Parker (The Society) wears a vintage Celine top, Isabel Marant Étoile skirt, and Saint Laurent Boots. Photographed by Tom Newton.

  • Hair Made For A Rainy Day

    Hollywood Babylon, Kenneth Anger’s 1959 book about the film industry’s formative years, is so juicy it’s easy to forget that most of the stories in it are half-true, at best.

    Tabloid in long-form, Anger details the scandals of Tinseltown’s very first stars (including Rudolph Valentino, Roscoe Arbuckle, and Clara Bow) against the backdrop of a city charged by rampant debauchery and high glamour.

    Whereas Hollywood Babylon deals mostly with the era’s nightlife, the workday habits of early film stars were pretty wild too. For our purposes, it’s all about the prep. Hence a little history lesson today, particularly about how one might get ready for a period moving picture.

    Early movies were shot on orthochromatic film, which was not sensitive to yellow-red wavelengths (so colors on that end of the spectrum became almost black). Blue and purple tones, in turn, showed up pale and whitish. The unfortunate on-screen effects of this were myriad—actors with ruddy skin looked dirty, and blue eyes would turn blank and spooky. The latter pitfall almost foiled the ambitions of eventual Academy Award winner Norma Shearer when she was told by D.W. Griffith, The Birth of a Nation director, that her eyes were “far too blue” to have any success in cinema.

    In order to create an impactful (and hopefully, natural) look under such conditions in the 1910s and ’20s, most actors were tasked with applying their own makeup (A common press photo set-up was very Top Shelf-like and featured the starlet at her vanity.), and studios would distribute guides for proper use of color. Blue-toned greasepaint was applied as a foundation and contouring shade, while lips were painted yellow. In real life, actors must have looked truly bizarre when they arrived at the studio. Early greasepaint was texturally problematic. Since it was applied with a heavy hand, the surface layer would often crack when the actor’s expression changed (not great for a medium that relied so heavily on overly dramatic, silent expression). It could also be hazardous—as was in the case of Dolores Costello (Drew Barrymore’s paternal grandmother), whose complexion and career were both damaged beyond repair by early film makeup. In 1914, Max Factor, a wig and cosmetic shop owner in Los Angeles, developed a solution in the form of Flexible Greasepaint. After its invention, he became the most sought-after makeup artist in Hollywood and the leading figure in cosmetic development for the industry.

    [blockquote author=”” pull=”normal”]It’s rainy day hair. This is how she looks when she’s running to take the subway[/blockquote]

    Factor’s personalized approach to makeup artistry cemented a few specific, studio-endorsed “looks.” For Clara Bow, he drew her sharply peaked cupid’s bow; Joan Crawford’s signature “smeared” lip (extending far beyond her natural line) assuaged the actress’ thin-lipped insecurities and was all thanks to Factor. Industry standards also required actors’ eyes to look deep-set and moody by shadowing them from lash line to socket, and eyebrows were drawn straight, bold, and very, very long (think Louise Brooks).

    When orthochromatic film gave way to panchromatic in the 1920s, shiny hair and eyelids captured the glow of incandescent bulbs used on-set to great effect. Factor kept pace, developing specific light-refracting hair dyes to suit this technical shift—even sprinkling gold dust on to Marlene Dietrich’s wigs when asked. He couldn’t rest on his laurels for long though—Technicolor was on the horizon, and with it came a new set of cosmetic challenges.

    A final note: In the early ‘30s, still riding the panchromatic “high shine” wave, Factor created a slick lip coat for his famous clients. The formula would go on to become commercially sold as “X-Rated,” the world’s very first lip gloss. Something I think we’re all still kind of into.

    —Lauren Maas

  • Pretty in Pastels

     wethepeople_jessiebush7

    Candy Colored

    Rocking the pastel hair trend

    Pink introduced us to it first, followed up by Kelly Osborn, Katy Perry, and even more conservative gals such as Rachel McAdams, which is our clear indicator this trend is big. A few years ago shades of blue, green, pink in your locks might label you as punk, but we know better than that now. Pastel pink hair has even made its way to the pages of Vogue, and celebs wearing turquoise tips on the red carpet, proof again that this trend has officially gone mainstream.

    First thing to do before jumping on this bandwagon is to select a color that best suits your natural coloring.

    pastel hair Now that you have a color, do you want to do a full head? Tips? Streaks? Permanent or wash out? It all really comes down to personal taste and lifestyle. Maybe you have a create job that wouldn’t mind a full head of pink hair in the office, or maybe you just want to do something different for a night out. Either way there’s something for you.

    Brands such as BLEACH London have monopolized on this hair trend. They offer a wide selection of pastel color dyes, all of which wash out in 2-10 washes depending on your hair. Everything from peach, purple to aquamarine can be purchased on their website.

    Kevin Murphy Color Bug is perfect for the girl who is looking for just a tiny touch of color that washes out in 1-2 washes.

    Seagull Hair Salon in New York City is for the gal ready to make take the plunge into full on color. Because permanent all over color can be a touchy matter, it’s best to leave this one up to the professionals.

    Now get out there and be COLORFUL!

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