Get This Bronzed, Liquid Make-Up Look for Labor Day

It’s the end of summer (can ya even believe it) and I like to keep it casual, so casual it is for today’s make-up look. Everyone has jumped on the “no make-up” bandwagon and while I like to believe I was one of the pioneers of this trend years ago with my first YT make-up tutorials, I’ll let it slide that everyone else is doing it too now. Nonetheless, I’m creating a glowing, bronzed, smudgy eye look today with only one product: a highly pigmented, liquid concealer in a shade that is far too dark for it to function as a concealer for me. In essence, I’ve chosen the wrong color and the resulting lewk is dark, bronzed, and a little mysterious. Very sexy when your eye looks a little imperfect (at least I think so).

I love using products in unconventional ways – I’m also doubling a powder blush as a soft lip stain here. Check it out!

The make-up tutorial is right here for your viewing pleasure and the products I’ve used are below!

PRODUCTS

FOUNDATION (Make Up Forever Ultra HD in color R330)

CONCEALER (Clé de Peau in Beige)

LIQUID BRONZER (Make Up Forever Ultra HD Invisible Concealer in color Y51)

Powder (Make Up Forever Microfinishing Pressed Powder in Color 2)

BLUSH / LIP (NARSissist Unfiltered Cheek Palette)

BROW PENCIL (Anastasia Perfect Brow Pencil in Cool Taupe)

BROW GEL (Glossier Boy Brow)

LASHES (Covergirl Lash Blast Mascara)

Holiday Beauty Looks 2015

[title subtitle=””]WINTER WONDERGLAM[/title]

What do the holidays have in store for us this year? Well, besides reuniting with family and friends, gift exchanging, and eating all the delicious food, they’re just another convenient excuse for us to experiment with bolder makeup. For a girl who usually keeps it simple with some bronzer and winged liner, I usually switch up my glam routine at the end of the year. Be bold and daring, I say, there’s nothing to lose!

I’ve picked three of my favorite makeup tutorials of which I’ll be taking bits and pieces from to achieve my perfect look. Choose from bold red lips to bronze eyeshadows. There’s even a more classic look with a little less pizazz—if that’s your thing. Whatever you’re feeling, I guarantee these tutorials will get you into the holiday spirit.

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Photography via Makmoda

Fashion People Are Already Requesting The Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs’ Fall 2014 collection was a study in tonality, and so were the wigs, individually dyed to match the pinks, creams, beiges, and brown shades of the clothes.

Wear it dry, and you’ve got your standard dusting of color—classic and predictable (in a good way). But wet! Wearing it wet opens a whole new world of opportunity. “What you’re doing is bringing out the pigmented nature of the shadow,” makeup artist Vincent Oquendo says. “Whenever I wet an eye shadow, it’s when I really want it to pop—but it really has to be a special kind of product to be able to blend after it sets. Because a lot of the times when it sets, you get streaking.” Nobody wants that. In order to avoid any wet shadow mishaps, follow these guidelines:

Product

Marc Jacobs' Fall 2014 collection was a study in tonality, and so were the wigs.

First, go with the obvious: any eye shadow labeled wet-to-dry. The Nars Dual-Intensity line is the standout—the singles come in 12 different shimmery shades, and there’s a corresponding brush (then there’s the newly released Dual Intensity Blush line, which was all over Fashion Week—but that’s a product for another post). Burberry also makes a few very versatile shades specifically for this in their Wet & Dry Silk Shadows. And the technique-specific eye shadow category isn’t just a ploy to get you to buy more product. “You can’t just use any eye shadow for this,” Vincent says. “Certain ones will harden up on top and become unusable because they’re not made for this.”

Baked shadows are also fair game—we’re fans of Laura Mercier’s Baked Eye Colour Wet/Dry and Lorac’s Starry-Eyed Baked Eye Shadow Trio in particular.

For more advanced players, Vincent suggests moving on to straight pigment (MAC or even OCC’s Pure Cosmetic Pigments). With the added moisture, they’ll become easier to layer with other products. For a look with more depth, try using a cream shadow as a based before swiping with a wet powder shadow. “It’s like insurance,” Vincent says. “You’re doubling your wearability.

Brush
This all depends on exactly what you want to do. “Mind the resistance,” Vincent says, particularly if you’re looking for uniform color across the lid. “I tend to recommend a blender brush, which is the brush that looks like a feather duster. If you do it with a stiff brush, you’re defeating yourself before you even start. The joy of a wet-to-dry is you have to get it right amount of product loaded up, and then it blends itself. If the brush is too stiff, it will leave the shadow streaky and then much harder to control.”

However, if tightlining or waterlining is in the cards, a much thinner brush is required accordingly.

Liquid
Do not, repeat, do not put eye drops, water, or any other sort of liquid directly on your eye shadow. This’ll screw up your product for later use. “Lately, I’ve been wetting the brush with the Glossier Soothing Face Mist, but Evian Mineral Water Spray is good for sensitive eyes,” Vincent says. If the top of your powder does get a little hardened by wet application, there’s a trick to remove it: Get a clean mascara spoolie and “exfoliate” your compact, Vincent recommends. This won’t crack the compact and will make it ready to go once more.

Photographed by Tom Newton.

Wet-To-Dry Eye Shadow: A Guide

Wet-to-dry eye shadows need not be complicated. While it might sound like yet another technique one must master in order to navigate a makeup counter, perhaps it’s better to think of it as a two-for-one deal.

Wear it dry, and you’ve got your standard dusting of color—classic and predictable (in a good way). But wet! Wearing it wet opens a whole new world of opportunity. “What you’re doing is bringing out the pigmented nature of the shadow,” makeup artist Vincent Oquendo says. “Whenever I wet an eye shadow, it’s when I really want it to pop—but it really has to be a special kind of product to be able to blend after it sets. Because a lot of the times when it sets, you get streaking.” Nobody wants that. In order to avoid any wet shadow mishaps, follow these guidelines:

Product

It's like insurance, Vincent says. "You're doubling your wearability."

First, go with the obvious: any eye shadow labeled wet-to-dry. The Nars Dual-Intensity line is the standout—the singles come in 12 different shimmery shades, and there’s a corresponding brush (then there’s the newly released Dual Intensity Blush line, which was all over Fashion Week—but that’s a product for another post). Burberry also makes a few very versatile shades specifically for this in their Wet & Dry Silk Shadows. And the technique-specific eye shadow category isn’t just a ploy to get you to buy more product. “You can’t just use any eye shadow for this,” Vincent says. “Certain ones will harden up on top and become unusable because they’re not made for this.”

Baked shadows are also fair game—we’re fans of Laura Mercier’s Baked Eye Colour Wet/Dry and Lorac’s Starry-Eyed Baked Eye Shadow Trio in particular.

For more advanced players, Vincent suggests moving on to straight pigment (MAC or even OCC’s Pure Cosmetic Pigments). With the added moisture, they’ll become easier to layer with other products. For a look with more depth, try using a cream shadow as a based before swiping with a wet powder shadow. “It’s like insurance,” Vincent says. “You’re doubling your wearability.

Brush
This all depends on exactly what you want to do. “Mind the resistance,” Vincent says, particularly if you’re looking for uniform color across the lid. “I tend to recommend a blender brush, which is the brush that looks like a feather duster. If you do it with a stiff brush, you’re defeating yourself before you even start. The joy of a wet-to-dry is you have to get it right amount of product loaded up, and then it blends itself. If the brush is too stiff, it will leave the shadow streaky and then much harder to control.”

However, if tightlining or waterlining is in the cards, a much thinner brush is required accordingly.

Liquid
Do not, repeat, do not put eye drops, water, or any other sort of liquid directly on your eye shadow. This’ll screw up your product for later use. “Lately, I’ve been wetting the brush with the Glossier Soothing Face Mist, but Evian Mineral Water Spray is good for sensitive eyes,” Vincent says. If the top of your powder does get a little hardened by wet application, there’s a trick to remove it: Get a clean mascara spoolie and “exfoliate” your compact, Vincent recommends. This won’t crack the compact and will make it ready to go once more.

Photographed by Tom Newton.

Fall Fashion: Get Ready with Me

Get Ready with Me in this new Fall Fashion video I made.  I cover a make-up look, hair-do (a big, messy bun), and outfit options!  Have fun 🙂
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Back to School Makeup Tutorial

Going back to school and looking for a beautiful look that’s light on the makeup but over-the-top gorgeous?  Watch my Back to School Makeup Tutorial video for my favorite day-to-day look.
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